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dc.contributor.advisorSolomon, H.
dc.contributor.authorSchoeman, Albert
dc.date.accessioned2022-08-16T12:35:36Z
dc.date.available2022-08-16T12:35:36Z
dc.date.issued2021-11
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/11660/11835
dc.description.abstractSince the collapse of communism in the late 1980s, a "third wave of democratisation" has swept across the globe, encouraging many developing countries (particularly in Africa) to embrace liberal democratic, free market principles. However, several states appeared unable to sustain democratic governments and economic growth during the 1990s. This resulted in the rise and prominence of the fragile state discourse, which characterised these states as soft, weak, failed, or collapsing in accordance with the degree to which they failed to meet the Weberian criteria for statehood. This Western, state-centric approach has further been reflected in the efforts of governments, non-governmental organisations, and donor agencies to promote peace and state-building as a remedy to state failure. The study argues that the state-centric approach exemplified by Weber's definition of the state and embraced by fragile state discourse and Western state-building efforts has failed to provide an objective, counter-hegemonic, and emancipatory perspective on states labelled as weak, failed, or collapsed. Rather than that, the study focusses on Hybrid Political Orders as a complementary perspective that takes a post-Western approach more suited to comprehending the realities of fragile states while also acknowledging the role of traditional authorities in the hybrid state-building process. Current international relations theory, with a particular emphasis on statehood, the fragile state perspective, and state-building, is accused of being exclusive and catering to a small minority at the expense of most of the world's population. Rather than exaggerating the politics of public bodies, political science and international relations theory should place a greater emphasis on people or politics at the grassroots level. The study attempted to provide a post-Western revisionist and alternative perspective on current state-building practises by emphasising the role of Hybrid Political orders in Somaliland.en_ZA
dc.language.isoenen_ZA
dc.publisherUniversity of the Free Stateen_ZA
dc.subjectThesis (Ph.D. (Governance and Political Transformation))--University of the Free State, 2021en_ZA
dc.subjectState-centric lensen_ZA
dc.subjectDemocracy - Somalilanden_ZA
dc.subjectDemocratic governments and economic growthen_ZA
dc.subjectHybrid political ordersen_ZA
dc.subjectGovernments organisationsen_ZA
dc.subjectNon-governmental organisationsen_ZA
dc.subjectPolitical science and international relationsen_ZA
dc.titleBeyond the state-centric lens of the fragile state discourse: the case for hybrid political orders in Somalilanden_ZA
dc.typeDissertationen_ZA
dc.rights.holderUniversity of the Free Stateen_ZA


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