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dc.contributor.advisorVan Niekerk, Caroline
dc.contributor.advisorDe Villiers, Frelet
dc.contributor.authorHellberg, Elsabie Petronella
dc.date.accessioned2019-10-23T11:00:51Z
dc.date.available2019-10-23T11:00:51Z
dc.date.issued2014-01
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/11660/10331
dc.description.abstractIn 2012 a new curriculum for Grade 10-12, Curriculum and Assessment Policy Statement (CAPS), was implemented in South African government schools. This new curriculum applies to all subjects, including Music. Before implementation, concern was raised by numerous music educators regarding the development and content of the curriculum. In reaction to the draft document, several suggestions were submitted to the Department of Basic Education by schools. Despite this, no significant changes were made to the curriculum. In comparison to the National Curriculum Statement (NCS), CAPS’s predecessor, CAPS restricts the stylistic choice to dominantly Western Art Music, Jazz or Indigenous African Music stylistic approach, especially concerning music history. The aim of this study was to critically review Music CAPS in terms of Music curricula of other countries from First, Second and Third World spheres. In addition, data was gathered through questionnaires from five samples (educators, learners, parents, lecturers and one curriculum assessor). The comparison between the different countries' Music curricula revealed that, except for South Africa and Trinidad and Tobago, a correlation exists between the various countries' demographic distribution and the stylistic preference in their Music curricula. Furthermore, South Africa's Music CAPS’s content and contextual framework is, especially regarding Western Art Music, comparable to the Music curricula of First World countries. On the other hand, lack of demarcation in its Indigenous African Music and almost non-existent composition constituent are inconsistent with First World countries. Concerning the questionnaires, several significant findings were made. These include participants' rating of Music CAPS concerning its link with tertiary music education and the music industry, the exclusion of music technology from the curriculum and the omission of Popular Music. Following the results of the study, suggestions are made towards an improved South African subject Music curriculum. Among others, proposals include raising the performance standards; reintroducing music technology; expanding the composition component; adding Contemporary Music; and addressing teacher competence through sustained training. Until now, changes to the South African subject Music curriculum were not research-based. Since this thesis is based on formal research, it will be submitted to the national assessment team who are currently reviewing Music CAPS.en_ZA
dc.language.isoenen_ZA
dc.publisherUniversity of the Free Stateen_ZA
dc.subjectDissertation (M.Mus. (Music))--University of the Free State, 2014en_ZA
dc.subjectAfrican musicen_ZA
dc.subjectCAPSen_ZA
dc.subjectComparative curriculumen_ZA
dc.subjectCurriculum developmenten_ZA
dc.subjectJazzen_ZA
dc.subjectMusic curriculumen_ZA
dc.subjectMusic educationen_ZA
dc.subjectMusic technologyen_ZA
dc.subjectOutcomes-baseden_ZA
dc.subjectSecondary schoolen_ZA
dc.subjectWestern Art musicen_ZA
dc.titleA critical review of South Africa's curriculum and assessment policy statement grades 10-12 musicen_ZA
dc.typeDissertationen_ZA
dc.rights.holderUniversity of the Free Stateen_ZA


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