Show simple item record

dc.contributor.authorSolomon, Hussein
dc.date.accessioned2016-07-21T10:22:10Z
dc.date.available2016-07-21T10:22:10Z
dc.date.issued2014-06
dc.identifier.citationSolomon, H. (2014). Potential for cooperation rather than conflict in the face of water degradation: the cases of the Nile River and Okavango River basins. Journal for Contemporary History, 39(1), 69-94.en_ZA
dc.identifier.issn0285-2422 (print)
dc.identifier.issn2415-0509 (online)
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/11660/3732
dc.description.abstractAlthough the notion of environmental security is a relatively new dimension of international relations, and of politics in general, it would be inane to assume that problems of environmental change are in any way novel. Environmental security is a phenomenon that is distinctively associated with the end of the Cold War. Much attention has been paid in both the scholarly literature and the policy community to the potential for conflict to arise as a result of environmental degradation. The aim of this article is to examine the nexus between environmental degradation and the potential for violent conflict by specifically referring to the potential for conflict to arise out of fresh water disputes by utilising the Nile River and Okavango River Basins as case studies.en_ZA
dc.language.isoenen_ZA
dc.publisherFaculty of the Humanities, University of the Free Stateen_ZA
dc.subjectEnvironmental securityen_ZA
dc.subjectResource scarcityen_ZA
dc.subjectViolent conflicten_ZA
dc.subjectEgypten_ZA
dc.subjectNile Riveren_ZA
dc.subjectSADCen_ZA
dc.subjectBotswanaen_ZA
dc.subjectOkavango Riveren_ZA
dc.titlePotential for cooperation rather than conflict in the face of water degradation: the cases of the Nile River and Okavango River basinsen_ZA
dc.typeArticleen_ZA
dc.description.versionPublisher's versionen_ZA
dc.rights.holderFaculty of the Humanities, University of the Free Stateen_ZA


Files in this item

Thumbnail

This item appears in the following Collection(s)

Show simple item record