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dc.contributor.advisorCoetzee, D.
dc.contributor.advisorFrancisco, C.
dc.contributor.authorLoubser, Nelmare
dc.date.accessioned2018-07-05T07:10:46Z
dc.date.available2018-07-05T07:10:46Z
dc.date.issued2018-01
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/11660/8680
dc.description.abstractBackground: Information about the contribution of core stability to athletic performance is still limited although it has been suggested to be an important factor. Thus, questions remain about the mechanisms of core stability, its measurement and its correlation with athletic performance in different types of sport. Objectives: To determine and describe the relationship between core stability and athletic performance measures in male and female university athletes. Methods: Hundred and twenty-five (125) male and fifty-two (52) female first team Kovsie athletes participating in rugby, hockey, cricket, basketball and soccer underwent five performance tests: the double leg lowering test (DLLT) to measure core stability, the forty-meter sprint test, the T-test, vertical jump and a medicine ball chest throw. All athletes performed three trials of each test in a randomized order. Correlations between the DLLT and each of the four performance tests were determined overall and separately by gender and sport. Furthermore, the effect of core stability on athletic performance measures was assessed using ANCOVA, fitting the factors sport and gender and the covariates age, height, weight, BMI and fat% of the athletes, as well as relevant interaction terms. Results: This study suggests that in the overall sample (both genders and all sports) all correlations between core stability (DLLT) and the performance tests were small (r<0.3). However, when the different sports were considered separately, for basketball players there were very large to large correlations between core stability (DLLT), the vertical jump (r=0.75) and chest throw (r=0.64). When stratified by gender: In females, overall for all sports, there were large correlations between core stability (DLLT), the vertical jump (r=0.67) and chest throw (r=0.53). However, when the different sports were considered separately, for basketball players, there were very large to large correlations between core stability (DLLT), the vertical jump (r=0.87), chest throw (r=0.76) and forty-meter sprint (r=-0.53). All of the other sports reflected small to moderate correlations between core stability (DLLT) and athletic performance. In males, overall for all sports, there were only small correlations between core stability (DLLT) and all the performance tests (r<0.2). However, when the different sports were considered separately, for basketball players there were large correlations between core stability (DLLT), the vertical jump (r=0.60) and chest throw (r=0.59). Furthermore, for soccer players there were large correlations between core stability (DLLT) and both the forty-meter sprint (r=0.58) and T-test (r=0.58); however, these correlations suggest a decrease in performance with increasing core stability (DLLT), since they are positive. Cricket players also revealed a large correlation between core stability (DLLT) and vertical jump (r=-0.51); however, this correlation also suggests a decrease in performance with increasing core stability (DLLT), since it is negative. When body fat percentage is considered, it is clear that body composition varies according to the type of sport. Overall (both genders and all sports), the study suggest very large to correlations between body fat percentage and the performance tests, T-test (r=0.67), forty-meter sprint (r=0.74) and vertical jump (r=-0.69). When the different sports were considered separately the results look similar; however, hockey (r=-0.51) and soccer (r=-0.54) also show a significant large correlation between the chest throw and body fat percentage (p<0.05). When stratified by gender: Overall, in females the results show large correlations between core stability, the T-test (r=0.55) and forty-meter sprint (r=0.61); whereas in males, these correlations are only small to moderate. Conclusion: The association between core stability (DLLT) and athletic performance appears to be weak in the overall sample, that is, when the factors gender and in particular type of sport are ignored; however, when correlations are considered separately, for the two genders and for the various types of sport, some large and very large correlations between core stability (DLLT) and specific performance tests can be identified. Thus, basketball players show large and very large correlations between core stability (DLLT) and both the vertical jump and chest throw. This study can serve as the basis of future research on the role of core stability (DLLT) in optimal performance in different sports; to the results of such research assist coaches and athletes with the development of training guidelines that enhances athletes’ performances. Ideally sport specific tests will be able to better define and to examine the correlation of core stability with performance.en_ZA
dc.language.isoenen_ZA
dc.publisherUniversity of the Free Stateen_ZA
dc.subjectCore stabilityen_ZA
dc.subjectAthletic performanceen_ZA
dc.subjectDouble leg lowering testen_ZA
dc.subjectUniversity athletesen_ZA
dc.subjectRugbyen_ZA
dc.subjectHockeyen_ZA
dc.subjectCricketen_ZA
dc.subjectBasketballen_ZA
dc.subjectSocceren_ZA
dc.subjectMalesen_ZA
dc.subjectFemalesen_ZA
dc.subjectDissertation (M.A. (Exercise and Sport Sciences))--University of the Free State, 2018en_ZA
dc.titleCore stability and athletics performance among university athletesen_ZA
dc.typeDissertationen_ZA
dc.rights.holderUniversity of the Free Stateen_ZA


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