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dc.contributor.advisorVan Tonder, G. J.
dc.contributor.authorGomo, Modreck
dc.date.accessioned2015-11-24T10:22:31Z
dc.date.available2015-11-24T10:22:31Z
dc.date.issued2011-11
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/11660/1882
dc.description.abstractThe study describes the application complimentary geohydrologic tools to investigate the geohydrological properties of an alluvial channel aquifer and its interaction with the river surface water resources. Primary field investigations were designed to determine the geologic, hydraulic, hydrogeochemical and solute transport properties of the alluvial channel aquifer as an important component of the groundwater‐surface water (GW‐SW) interaction system. The secondary investigations were then aimed at assessing groundwater discharge and recharge mechanisms of the alluvial channel aquifer at a local scale (< 1000 m). A water balance model was developed for the groundwater‐surface system as a tertiary level of investigation. Geological characterisation results show the spatial variation in the physical properties of unconsolidated aquifer materials between boreholes and at different depth. The drawdown derivative diagnostic analysis shows that the alluvial channel aquifer system response during pumping can be described by the following major groundwater flow characteristics; Typical Theis response; transition period from initial Theis response to radial acting flow (RAF); radial acting flow in the gravel‐sand layer and river single impermeable boundary effects. Detailed studies of the hydrogeochemical processes in the alluvial aquifer system have shown that dissolution of silicate weathering, dolomite and calcite minerals, and ion exchanges are the dominant hydrogeochemical processes that controls groundwater quality. Quantitative and qualitative investigations indicate that the alluvial channel aquifer is being recharged through preferential infiltration recharge as facilitated by cavities and holes created by the burrowing animals and dense tree rooting system. Tracer tests under natural gradient were successfully conducted in an alluvial channel aquifer, thus providing some advice on how to conduct tracer breakthrough tests under natural gradients in a typical alluvial channel aquifer. The findings of the study also highlights the value of developing a water balance model as a preliminary requirement before detailed GW‐SW interaction investigations can be conducted. Based on the theoretical conceptualizations and field evidence it is suggested that studies be conducted to determine if alluvial channel aquifers can be further classified based on the nature of the hosting river channel. The classification would split the alluvial channel aquifer into alluvial cover and fractured‐bedrock, or a combination of the two. The applications of the PhD thesis findings are not only limited to the case study site, but have important implications for GW‐SW interaction studies, groundwater resource development and protection in areas where groundwater occurs in alluvial channel deposits.en_ZA
dc.language.isoenen_ZA
dc.publisherUniversity of the Free Stateen_ZA
dc.subjectThesis (Ph.D. (Institute for Groundwater Studies))--University of the Free State, 2011en_ZA
dc.subjectAquifersen_ZA
dc.subjectGroundwateren_ZA
dc.subjectAlluviumen_ZA
dc.subjectFluvisolen_ZA
dc.subjectHydrogeochemical processen_ZA
dc.subjectWater balance modeen_ZA
dc.subjectNatural gradient tracer testingen_ZA
dc.subjectRecharge mechanismsen_ZA
dc.subjectGravel-sanden_ZA
dc.subjectChannel depositsen_ZA
dc.subjectAlluvial channel aquiferen_ZA
dc.titleA groundwater-surface water interaction study of an alluvial channel aquiferen_ZA
dc.typeThesisen_ZA
dc.rights.holderUniversity of the Free Stateen_ZA


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