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dc.contributor.advisorVan Wyk, J. B.
dc.contributor.advisorCloete, S. W. P.
dc.contributor.authorKao, 'Mamolleloa A.
dc.date.accessioned2019-12-05T12:30:52Z
dc.date.available2019-12-05T12:30:52Z
dc.date.issued2019-06
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/11660/10392
dc.description.abstractThe first part of the study compared a commercial, the Dorper as an arguably adapted commercial breed to the Namaqua Afrikaner as an unselected, indigenous, far-tail breed. The Dorper conclusively outperformed the Namaqua Afrikaner with reference to live weight and growth traits. On the other hand, Namaqua Afrikaner lambs were superior to Dorpers for an adaptive trait like total tick count. Lamb survival was unaffected by breed. When meat traits were considered, it was evident that Dorper lambs outperformed their Namaqua Afrikaner contemporaries for important attributes associated with size and meat yield, namely carcass weight and dressing percentage. Dorper carcasses also attained better grades and were more tender according to instrumental measurements (Warner Brazler equipment). Dorper lambs were fatter than Namaqua Afrikaner lambs, as derived from the backfat thickness at the 13th rib and the rump. While leaner meat would be preferred by health-conscious consumers, it is important to note that, under the conditions of the study, Dorper carcasses were more likely to be in the preferred grades. In the second part of the study, Dorpers were evaluated against the SA Mutton Merino (SAMM; the most numerous dual-purpose breed in South Africa), as well as the reciprocal cross between the two breeds. No conclusive breed differences were found for weight traits, lamb survival, tick counts or meat traits. However, there was a suggestion that lamb survival of Dorpers was higher than that of their SAMM contemporaries (P = 0.08), but significance could not be demonstrated. Crossbred progeny outperformed the midparent value by 6.3% for weaning weight. The corresponding study on meat traits was constrained by low numbers. However, it was evident that the observed heterosis for weaning weight was also present a later growth stage. Direct heterosis estimates amounted to 7.7% for slaughter weight and 7.1% for carcass weight. These estimates were consistent with the literature for the expected level of heterosis for early growth when assessed in fairly divergent sheep breeds. This outcome once again reiterated that crossbreeding may have a definite role to play at the commercial level in the South African sheep industry. Further studies on the comparison of indigenous genetic resources with commercial breeds, as well as crossbreeding studies with the variety of available breeds were recommended.en_ZA
dc.description.sponsorshipLesotho National Manpower Development secretariat (NMDS)en_ZA
dc.language.isoenen_ZA
dc.publisherUniversity of the Free Stateen_ZA
dc.subjectDissertation (M.Sc. (Animal, Wildlife and Grassland Sciences))--University of the Free State, 2019en_ZA
dc.subjectSheep industryen_ZA
dc.subjectSouth Africaen_ZA
dc.subjectGenetic variationen_ZA
dc.titleBreed effects and non additive genetic variation in indigenous and commercial sheep in an extensive environmenten_ZA
dc.typeDissertationen_ZA
dc.rights.holderUniversity of the Free Stateen_ZA


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